About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 3
CNNW 2
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
CSPAN 1
MSNBC 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
do you reconcile what science has established what what you may think your faith teaches. when it comes to the age of the earth, there is no conflict. god created the heavens and the earth and scientific advances has given us insight. but i believe he has done it. and i have reconciled that. but other people have a deeper thought. in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe and that means teaching them science. but also parents have the right to teach them theology and reconcile those two things as they see fit. that's the point the president was making back in 2007. so that's what i was saying. >> accepting that context, household is the earth? >> -- how old is the fourth, four and a half billion years old. god created it out of nothing. and science has given us insight as to how and when he did it. and the more science learns the more i'm convinced that god is real. >> you have had a very fascinating faith journey. you were baptized catholic and mormon and later to the catholic church. >> maybe i'm a theologian. and you go to mass an
family and friends, everything that you love all in the name of science. >>> "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. this should be interesting. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very goo
.5 billion. doug mcelway has the story. >> we realize it is the stuff of science fiction. we intend to make it science fact. >> it would appear too incredible. except these former nasa managers are credible and experienced. calling their project golden spike. they planned to send man back to the moon within a decade on commercial spacecraft at a cost of $7 billion to $8 billion. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s. base imher shall -- commercial trans transportation system. it is from virtually any nation or any corporation. or any individual. >> reporter: -- >> for many robotic missions they know the moon is tapping. >> it is rich in platinum and other elements of exotic value are there in huge quantity. >> helium 3 which does not exist in sufficient quantities on earth is plentiful on the moon. it could be mined and returned to earth to provide fuel for nuclear fusion which unlining the fission powered reactors leaves little radio active waste. >> and liftoff. >> extreme frugality is factored into the planning. >> adapt crew capsules that are already in development. o
another crack at that science question. clarify an answer he gave to "gq" when he was asked about the age of the earth. remember, senator rubio took a little grief, saying that he was not qualified to answer the question, calling it, quote, one of life's great mysteries. remember, i'm not a scientist, man, the whole thing. yesterday, mike, i guess you spoke to him as part of the "playbook" breakfast and you gave him a chance to explain that answer. let's listen. >> how old do you think the earth is? >> first of all, the answer i gave was trying to make the same point the president made a few years ago, and that is there is no scientific debate on the age of the earth. i mean, it's established it. pretty definitively. at least 4.5 billion years old. i was referring to a theological debate which is a pretty healthy debate. >> mike, what did you come away with talking to marco rubio yesterday? >> people in the room came away thinking that he was really smooth, really on his game. and this is an example of that. he had that very clumsy sort of dismissive answer when he was asked by "gq" befor
ahead. >> reporter: this political science professor at uw called this an interesting bind for the president, saying my crens is they will look the other way, but find a couple high profile people who are well beyond the bounds of our new law and bust them, but leave everyone else completely alone. if that happens, the target could be on frank snarr, but he thinks he's just the first and more private smoking rooms will soon pop up. >> and more power to them. if they can raise revenue for the state, that's what it's all about. that's what we're in business for. >> now, the bar owner stresses the buying or selling of marijuana inside his club is strictly prohibited. >>> well, still ahead this morning, as fighting continues in syria, a new move by rebel forces to improve coordination could bring on support from the united states. >> and in london, more backlash over the death of a nurse who fell victim to a radio show prank. find out what people are saying the radio host should do now. we'll be right back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all.
for those living near the coast. bill nye the science guy is going the break it down. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. the most common side effect is lo
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious sideeffects. ♪ is your cholesterol at goal? alk to your doctor aut crestor. [ female announcer ] if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. >> laura: in th
seen it work for people with parkenson's. >> you're looking at science at a whole different level and excited as a physician and a surgeon, this is a major break through. six of these procedures have already been performed in toronto and this is the first one being done at johns hopkins and we're excited about this, and the second case, it's scheduled in december. as we mention about 70,000 of the procedures have been done for parkinson's, we see less tremor and really good outcome. what's important,a-- they have a clinical trial, and 20 patients are getting the battery of pacemakers and 20 followed up and we'll see what the result is going to be. the outcome of this trial should be out within a year and preliminary results should show that the pace of this short-term memory and slowing of the brain is going to be much less. so, this is a very exciting field and the fact that it's been done so many times, tells us it's quite safe. >> quickly before i let you go. do we know at this juncture if there's a certain stage of alzheimer's that you should actually treat this person with a
, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and particularly in the early months of 2007, during the surge in iraq, i think one of the hardest decisions i made, maybe the hardest decision that i made as secretary was extending the length of deployments in iraq and afghanistan from twelve months to 15 months, and we did it for about a year and a half. and two years, and the alternative was to cut short their time at home. so if they were only to serve twelve months in the theatre then they might only be home for nine months or eight months or something, and so the recommendation of all of the generals and others was do the 15 and let them have the year at home, but there is no
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> from america's news headquarters, i'm ainsley earhardt. new developments tonight in a case involving those two missing cousins from iowa. police say hunters have found two bodies and they think they are elizabeth collins and lyra morse. the cousins vanished on a bike ride last july. the bodies were discovered this afternoon, but police didn't elaborate on where, saying the area is still being investigated. citigroup, the nation's third largest bark, laying off thousands of employees, mostly people who work in local branches and foreign operations. the bank will slash 11,000 jobs, 11% of its workforce, looking to save more than $1 billion a year. the bank didn't fair well in the 2008 financial collapse and had to take two taxpayer-funded loans. i'm ainsley earhardt. now back to "on the record" with gret a. thank you for watching. >> you're the president of the united states. you've got the mighty pen. you bailed out the banks. bail out the american people that don't have homes for the holidays. the presid
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
this fiction science instead of science fiction. this is completely baseless. there's not a shred of evidence in favor of it. but it sure is a lot of fun to be worrying about the end of the world. hollywood knows that, too. as far as the mayan calendar is considered, alex, this is a complete misunderstanding of how calendars work. look, we faced this kind of calendar cliff every year when on december 31 you run out of pages on your calendar. you don't think it's the end of the world. you just think it's time to go to the stationery store and buy a new calendar. we are according to some experts coming to an end of one of the mayan's long cycle of days. but they themselves the living descendants of the mayan say a new cycle will begin. >> the buru four times the size of earth will come close to earth and cause all kinds of disasters. any truth there? >> absolutely not. the buru as it's called is a completely made up planet from the name of an ancient sumerian god. can you imagine, alex, if there really were a planet that big coming close to us now in december? is there any chance that you and a
of the story is they will have more time for arts and music. our kids stink at math and science. there is no indication there is a link between this dump of federal and local money and whether results. the school system is one of the worst in the state. we gave them a free $100 million high school to motivate learning and test scores haven't changed at all. no one can connect this money with better result. isn't that the point to get smarter kids? martha: it is the point. we have seen in so many of our inner cities, the more money that gets thrown at the program over the years, we have seen a declining rate of grades and test scores. so we added more money, we are getting lower test scores. you want to make sure you will have quality in those hours. up believe the way to do that is to promote school choice which doesn't seem to be happening in this administration. >> what can do you with a few dollars for kids? before president obama became president congress passed a d.c. voucher program and was sending them to sidwell where the president's daughters go. one of the first things
. that is what inspires people to go into heart fields like science and genering. they accomplish things in space but help defend our country and have innovations that keep our economy vibrant. >> it is a lot easier as a kid to look at some of the pictures we're watching now, some of the lunar explorers. the last lunar mission was taking place 40 years ago this week. it was a lot easier to get excited when you see, there's gene cernan bouncing around in moondust. when you have, i don't know, when you have just the robot up there on mars, yeah it is doing great work but not exactly a human connection. is that still inspiring kids today? >> i think there is a lack of near-term excitement. what's nasa doing now? what is it going to do the next five years for a college graduate looking for a job? my daughter is a aerospace engineering grad student looking to work in the space program but there is question whether there will be those opportunities. the robot is great but we need the human connection so we experience that ourselves with our machines we send out as scouts in advance. nasa needs a purpos
events are allowed the office of science and technology policy to identify work apps are. you can discuss value in a couple different ways. primarily whether it is valuable to democracy and people holding the government accountable, or valuable to companies such as members of my coalition of want to use it for new business opportunities or both. our coalition focuses on both vote for democracy and business opportunities are still not disclosed or standardized. although there is incremental progress without a legislative agenda, i think the white house can't get there. >> this is good and that leads us to the causal part of the program of the convening, perhaps. so we were talking about institutionalization. we have seen efforts along those lines. the open government initiative and direct it, although it certainly hasn't -- it's translated into something to get agencies moving in the same direction. we saw more of the principle problem with the leadership is saying do this and agencies were saying no, no. it was the mid-level folks. some of this is perhaps a one point ethics czar. norm ici
. they want o make sure that science and engineers that are educated here in america or that have great ideas and want to be in america have a chance to come here. that has been difficult over the years. that is something that can get done, but i think they will run into some opposition because people who want a more comprehensive bill that would deal with farm labor, for example, they are worried that if you get that one bill done that helps the business community with the smartest and brightest immigrants, that you won't be dealing with everybody and i think that that will be the rub. >> steve: kay bailey hutchison has got legislation in the senate. we'll see if anything happens there. apparently at the white house yesterday, some blogger was standing this and said hey, look there, goes rachel madow. and then, hey, it's al sharpton. there goes -- what were all the msnbc guys doing at the white house? apparently they were invited by the white house to talk about what the president's pitch is regarding the fiscal cliff. he's been adamant, the top 2% have to pay a higher tax rate and apparentl
that democrats see critical to investing in the next generation, education, or basic science, without finding ways to control the growth of entitlement spending, or even the affordable care act? >> there's a question we have quite a democratic shift happened, and it's happening not forever but the next 25 years. many of the baby boomers would like to live forever but probably not going to, even though we're going to try. you know, it is, that's our reality but with 10,000 new seniors every day, coming online every day in this country and we have fewer workers to pay into medicare, and that's an issue. so yes, we have -- we also have to understand those are a lot of seniors who we are also proposing to take it. so can we make sure the health delivery system is more efficient? yes, we can. i talk about some of the most to do that. we should demand more accountability on that. beneficiaries participate not by denying them care, denying them benefits, but by being healthier, taking up recommendations, following doctor recommendations. not doing too much doctor shopping. they're is responsible on
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)